CT-based micromotion analysis method can assess early implant migration and development of radiolucent lines in cemented glenoid components: a clinical feasibility study

Authors

  • Cyrus Brodén Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK; Section of Orthopaedics, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Orthopaedics, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Peter Reilly Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK
  • Monica Khanna Department of Clinical Imaging, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
  • Ravi Popat Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK
  • Henrik Olivecrona Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Dylan Griffiths Trauma & Orthopaedic Department, Imperial NHS Trust, London, UK
  • Olof Sköldenberg Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Orthopaedics, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Roger Emery Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.2340/17453674.2022.1976

Keywords:

CTMA, early migration, migration, RSA, shoulder arthroplasty

Abstract

Background and purpose: CT micromotion analysis (CTMA) has been considered as an alternative to radiostereometry (RSA) for assessing early implant migration of orthopedic implants. We investigated the feasibility of CTMA to assess early migration and the progression of radiolucent lines in shoulder arthroplasties over 24 months using sequential low-dose CT scans.

Patients and methods: 7 patients were included and underwent 9 primary total shoulder arthroplasties. We made CT scans preoperatively, within 1 week postoperatively, and after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. At each follow-up, postoperative glenoid migration and any development of radiolucent lines were assessed. Clinical outcomes were recorded at all time points except within 1 week postoperatively.

Results: For the glenoid component, the median translation and median rotation were 0.00–0.10 mm and –1.53° to 1.05° at 24 months. Radiolucent lines could be observed around all glenoid components. The radiolucent lines developed from the periphery to the center of the implant for 6 glenoid components during follow-up. The Constant Score improved from a mean of 30 (21–51) preoperatively to 69 (41–88) at 24 months.

Interpretation: CTMA can be used to identify early migration and the development of radiolucent lines over time in glenoid components. Clinical trials with a larger sample size and longer follow-up are needed to establish the relationship between migration, radiolucent lines, loosening, and clinical outcome.

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Published

2022-02-01

How to Cite

Brodén, C., Reilly, P., Khanna, M., Popat, R., Olivecrona, H., Griffiths, D., Sköldenberg, O., & Emery, R. (2022). CT-based micromotion analysis method can assess early implant migration and development of radiolucent lines in cemented glenoid components: a clinical feasibility study. Acta Orthopaedica, 93, 277–283. https://doi.org/10.2340/17453674.2022.1976

Issue

Section

Non-randomized clinical study

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